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Environment

ivory-billed nestling

Photograph of field guide J. J. Kuhn and ivory-billed woodpecker fledgling, by James T. Tanner, a doctoral candidate at Cornell University, March 1938. Photo taken at the Singer Tract swamp forest, Louisiana, courtesy U.S. Fish and Wildlife.

In an era of global climate change, recent natural disasters, and quickly changing terrain, the environment and landscape of the South—as well as that famous Southern sense of place—have been topics of importance inside and outside our region for some time, and they were the subjects of a Special Environment Issue in Fall 2001.

Our full catalog of material on the Environment is below, with direct links to each essay and feature in full at Project Muse. Select recent essays and features are also available with a single click as a $0.99 download for Kindle, Nook, or Sony Reader.

Going to Texas
by Carolyn Osborn
“Crossing the Mississippi River, putting my head out of the window to stare at its broad muddy width—the last boundary of my well-known southern world—I left Tennessee.”
Southern Cultures, Volume 19, Number 4, Winter 2013
Full Issue for KindleNookKobo E-ReaderGoogle Nexus, and Sony Reader (coming soon).

BEYOND GRITS & GRAVY: My Integrity Means More Than a Dollar Bill: Crandall Fountain’s Intentional Agrarianism
by Christopher Fowler
“Enter our story’s main character. His response to agribusiness is what makes this story unique.”
Full Issue for KindleNookKobo E-ReaderGoogle Nexus, and Sony Reader
Southern Cultures, Volume 19, Number 2, Summer 2013

Harvey H. Jackson III
The Rise and Decline of the Redneck Riviera: An Insider’s History of the Florida-Alabama Coast
reviewed by Anthony J. Stanonis
Full Issue for Kindlefor Nook, or for Sony Reader
Southern Cultures, Volume 18, Number 4, Winter 2012

Bland Simpson and Scott Taylor
The Coasts of Carolina: Seaside to Sound Country
reviewed by Lawrence Earley
Full Issue for Kindlefor Nook, or for Sony Reader
Southern Cultures, Volume 18, Number 4, Winter 2012

“The Deepest Reality of Life”: Southern Sociology, the WPA, and Food in the New South 
     by Marcie Cohen Ferris, Guest Editor
     ”‘I know your damned photographer’s soul writhes, but to hell with it. Do you think I give a damn about a photographer’s soul with Hitler at our doorstep?’”
$1.99 download for Kindlefor Nook, or for Sony Reader
Full Issue for Kindle for Nook, or for Sony Reader
Southern Cultures, Volume 18, Number 2, Summer 2012: Food

“Boomtown Rabbits”: The Rabbit Market in Chatham County, North Carolina, 1880-1920
      by Will Sexton
      “Although the same cottontails flourished across the region, Chatham County turned its rabbits into something like a regional brand, recognized throughout the South and along the eastern seaboard. By the end of the nineteenth century, Siler City had become the de facto rabbit capital of the southeast.”
Full Issue for Kindlefor Nook, or for Sony Reader
Southern Cultures, Volume 18, Number 2, Summer 2012: Food

The Case of the Wild Onions: How Ramps Paved the Way for Cherokee Rights
      by Courtney Lewis
      “Finally, the defendant was called to testify. The air went from lighthearted post-lunch chatting to dour and intense. Judging from the sudden solemnity, one might have imagined that this trial was for drug trafficking or a violent crime. But it was about something that had much more profound implications: picking plants-specifically, wild onions.”
Full Issue for Kindlefor Nook, or for Sony Reader
Southern Cultures, Volume 18, Number 2, Summer 2012: Food

Southern Snow
     by Nancy Hatch Woodward
     “There’s a silence in a snowy dawn that forces you to look anew at what has been transformed from the customary landscape of your day-to-day life. Dogwoods glisten in their silver finery; bowing fir limbs form a secret cathedral.”
$0.99 download for Kindlefor Nook, or for Sony Reader
Full Issue for Kindlefor Nook, or for Sony Reader
Southern Cultures, Volume 18, Number 1, Spring 2012

“For the Scrutiny of Science and the Light of Revelation”: American Blood Falls
     by Tom Maxwell
     ”Showers of blood, however dreadful, were not news. Pliny, Cicero, Livy, and Plutarch mentioned rains of blood and flesh. Zeus makes it rain blood, ‘as a portent of slaughter,’ in Homer’s Iliad.”
$0.99 download for Kindlefor Nook, or for Sony Reader
Full Issue for Kindlefor Nook, or for Sony Reader
Southern Cultures, Volume 18, Number 1, Spring 2012

Native Ground
     photographs by Rob McDonald
     “If convention has it right, these are writers who bear something close to a genetic predisposition to produce a literature suffused with place.”
$0.99 download for Kindlefor Nook, or for Sony Reader
Full Issue for Kindlefor Nook, or for Sony Reader
Southern Cultures, Volume 18, Number 1, Spring 2012

Big Bone Lick,” “Big Talk,” and “Flush”
three poems by Robert Morgan
     ” . . . for ten millennia, the bones
seemed wreckage from a mighty dream . . . “
$0.99 download for Kindlefor Nook, or for Sony Reader
Full Issue for Kindle ($3.96), for Nook ($4.15), or for Sony Reader ($4.70) 
Southern Cultures, Volume 17, Number 3, Fall 2011: Memory 

“Those little color snapshots”: William Christenberry
    interviewed by William R. Ferris
featuring full-color photographs by William Christenberry
Follow the evolution of the vision and career of one of the South’s foremost photographers as he tells his story in his own words.
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Full Issue 
for Kindle ($3.96), for Nook ($6.95), or for Sony Reader ($4.70)
 Southern Cultures, Volume 17, Number 2, Summer 2011: Photography II

“A recourse that could be depended upon”: Picking Blackberries and Getting By after the Civil War
    by Bruce E. Baker
     ”Nineteenth-century newspaper accounts tell of snake attacks, such as the one on an African American woman near Montgomery, Alabama, who was killed by a large rattlesnake while out picking berries with a companion. Hornets, as my brother could tell you, can be a problem, and bears are not unheard of.”
Full Issue for Kindle ($7.96), for Nook ($7.96), or for Sony Reader ($9.45)  
Southern Cultures
, Volume 16, Number 4, Winter 2010

Growing Roots in Rocky Soil: An Environmental History of Southern Rock
     by Bartow J. Elmore
  “In 1967, the Allman brothers headed to California, hoping to make it big in a band called Hour Glass. The band quickly became popular on the Los Angeles music circuit, playing at popular clubs like the Whiskey a Go Go and drawing the attention of rising rock stars like Neil Young and Janis Joplin.”
Full Issue for Kindle ($7.96), for Nook ($7.96), or for Sony Reader ($9.45)
Southern Cultures, Volume 16, Number 3, Fall 2010: Music IV

The Edible South
     by Marcie Cohen Ferris
     “Even as southern populations (and landscapes) have evolved, food and place remain indelibly linked in the southern imagination.”
Southern Cultures, Volume 15, Number 4, Winter 2009: Food I

Drum Head Stew: The Power and Poetry of Terroir
     by Bernard L. Herman
  “‘Oh Violet, keep the head on the fish, because I want my eyeballs.’”
Southern Cultures, Volume 15, Number 4, Winter 2009: Food I

Wormsloe’s Belly: Understanding the History of a Southern Plantation through Food
     by Drew A. Swanson
     “The plantation’s residents were such voracious drinkers that the remains of wine bottles were the most reliable way to date colonial discoveries during excavation of the old fort site.”
Southern Cultures, Volume 15, Number 4, Winter 2009: Food I

Canning Tomatoes, Growing “Better and More Perfect Women”: The Girls’ Tomato Club Movement
     by Elizabeth Engelhardt
  “‘If somebody were to tell you that a group of little country girls who never have been near a big city have built up a business so large and important that papers all over the country are telling about it, you would think it was a new kind of fairy tale.’”
Southern Cultures, Volume 15, Number 4, Winter 2009: Food I

Eat It to Save It: April McGreger in Conversation with Tradition
     by Whitney E. Brown
     “There is a deep, pulsing current of heritage and emotion when your hands are in the dirt, and that’s a feeling worth recapturing in the age of the iPhone.”
Southern Cultures, Volume 15, Number 4, Winter 2009: Food I

Anne Mitchell Whisnant
Super-Scenic Motorway: A Blue Ridge Parkway History
    reviewed by Charles L. Perdue
    ”My wife and I recall two primary impressions: the spectacular views from the Parkway and Skyline Drive, and the feeling of a long, vast emptiness and loneliness as we passed very few other automobiles and rarely saw as much as a house light as we drove into the night.”
Southern Cultures, Volume 15, Number 2, Summer 2009

Lessons of Core Sound Workboats
     by Lawrence S. Earley
     “Peering across the sound in the twilight, a fisherman quickly knows who is anchored for the night or heading to shore. He reads another boat by the pattern of its lights, the design of its pilot house, the lift of its stern, the shape of its bow.”
Southern Cultures, Volume 15, Number 2, Summer 2009

On Being Asked to Pray for a Van and Snapper
     poetry by Michael Chitwood
     “It’s a kind of monster,
cobbled from parts of other creatures—”
Southern Cultures, Volume 15, Number 2, Summer 2009

Roger D. Abrahams, with Nick Spitzer, John F. Szwed, and Robert Farris Thompson
Blues for New Orleans: Mardi Gras and America’s Creole Soul
       reviewed by Perry Kasprzak
       “New Orleans as a city that ‘came into being with a kind of antic doom embedded into it,’ founded as it was in a hostile New World swamp, is brought into bright focus by Nature’s recent, temporary, reclaiming of the land, and Man’s persistent desire to rebuild the city.”
Southern Cultures, Volume 15, Number 1, Spring 2009

“Take Time to Appreciate”: The Mississippi Delta Region, 1994–2002
     by Bruce J. West
     “A lush and exotic landscape—a setting encouraging and supporting heroic transformation—nurtures all endeavors.”
Southern Cultures, Volume 15, Number 1, Spring 2009

Tobacco Mosaic: “Lexicon” and “The Sharecroppers”
     poetry by Davis McCombs
     “He crouched in the shade of the barn, thinking and mumbling,
and the wind ripped the words from his mouth . . .”
Southern Cultures, Volume 15, Number 1, Spring 2009

“The Obituary of Nations”: Ethnic Cleansing, Memory, and the Origins of the Old South
     by James Taylor Carson
 ”The wilderness settlers thought they were entering was in fact a landscape created and managed by the First Peoples.”
Southern Cultures, Volume 14, Number 4, Winter 2008: First Peoples

Philip C. Kolin and Susan Swartwout, Editors
Hurricane Blues: Poems about Katrina and Rita
     reviewed by Rachel Richardson
     ”This volume provides a record of the lingering trauma and the need for art–for creation out of the rubble.”
Southern Cultures, Volume 14, Number 2, Summer 2008

Storm Journal: The Story of the Bay Town Inn
     by Ellis Anderson
     ”The doorway to Number Five suddenly opened directly onto an ocean writhing in fury. The front rooms no longer existed. The floor of the hallway had been sucked into the surf.”
Southern Cultures, Volume 14, Number 2, Summer 2008: Katrina

What Was Found
     by Maura Fitzgerald
     ”You’ll wait in this city where they bury their dead and their Mardi Gras floats above ground. And there you’ll rest next to a bust of a Saints quarterback, the last Viking king, a painted foam Tin Man and his oversized heart. And for an epitaph, a sign on a far wall to state the obvious: . . . the stuff dreams are made of.”
Southern Cultures, Volume 14, Number 2, Summer 2008: Katrina

Home at the Mouth of the Mississippi
     by Judith A. Howard
     “Little notice has been given to Plaquemines Parish, where few structures escaped damage from Katrina, and where the region south of Port Sulphur looked like a bombed-out war zone. Yet this isolated parish suffered only four deaths and two missing in Katrina, out of a population of 27,000.”
Southern Cultures, Volume 14, Number 2, Summer 2008: Katrina

Broken Levees, Broken Lives, and a Broken Nation after Hurricane Katrina
     by Karen M. O’Neill
     “Many people viewed the extreme disorder after Hurricane Katrina as the failure of a comprehensive system of public works and emergency preparedness they assumed was designed to ensure safety and security. No such system exists.”
Southern Cultures, Volume 14, Number 2, Summer 2008: Katrina

Is for, to Hold
     poetry by Bob Hicok
     ”The road had disappeared, the field,
the sundial was about to go under, meaning shadows
would have been unable to stay on schedule.”
Southern Cultures, Volume 14, Number 2, Summer 2008: Katrina

Bottomland Ghost: Southern Encounters and Obsessions with the Ivory-Billed Woodpecker
     by Michael K. Steinberg
     “Until the announcement in 2005 of the rediscovery of the ivory-bill, there had not been a broadly accepted ivory-bill sighting for sixty years.”
Southern Cultures, Volume 14, Number 1, Spring 2008

HumaNatureScapes
     photography by Keri McLeod
   “I shot primarily under low light, which allowed mystery to sink into each image and space.”
Southern Cultures, Volume 14, Number 1, Spring 2008 

“Riolama”
     poetry by William Alexander Percy
      “There is a land beyond the lands you know. . .”
Southern Cultures, Volume 14, Number 1, Spring 2008

Pete Daniel
Toxic Drift:  Pesticides and Health in the Post-World War II South
     reviewed by Otis L. Graham
     ”‘The corporate compulsion to market first, test later, and resist regulation has left a legacy of widespread sickness and death.’”
Southern Cultures, Volume 14, Number 1, Spring 2008

The Injuries of Time and Weather
     by Tom Rankin
     “ Photographs in the South have reflected the patterns and vicissitudes of the weather, both climatic and social-political, throughout our history. And no region’s photographic tradition has been more engaged in, maybe even obsessed with, exploring and reflecting the injuries and scars of time—brought on more specifically by war, bondage, discrimination, class conflicts, and the ravages of nature, to name a few forces—than photography in the American South.”
Southern Cultures, Volume 13, Number 2, Summer 2007: Photography I

Jack Temple Kirby
Mockingbird Song: Ecological Landscapes of the South
reviewed by Otis L. Graham
Southern Cultures, Volume 13, Number 1, Spring 2007

Doc Watson on the Cicada Concert, 00
     poetry by R.T. Smith
     ”I wish they’d get tired of turning and play.”
Southern Cultures, Volume 12, Number 4, Winter 2006: Music I

Life-everlasting: Nature and Culture on Sapelo Island
     by Mary Hussmann
   “What was most moving was that it was here that the ghosts of the people we’d read about jumped out of history and into our lives.”
Southern Cultures, Volume 12, Number 1, Spring 2006 

John Lane
Chattooga: Descending Into the Myth of Deliverance River
     reviewed by Timothy Silver
     ”Billy Redden, the iconic ‘banjo boy’ who will ever be remembered for playing with Drew Ballinger on the hit song ‘Dueling Banjos,’ now mops floors at a local Huddle House and has a second job at a barbecue restaurant named—as luck would have it—’Oinkers.’”
Southern Cultures, Volume 11, Number 4, Winter 2005

Praying with George Herbert in Late Winter
     poetry by Tom Andrews
     “Outside, light swarms
and particularizes the snow …”
Southern Cultures, Volume 11, Number 2, Summer 2005

“Bartram’s Trail” and “Pawley’s Island Shakedown”
     two poems by Thorpe Moeckel
     “There’s no horizon,
no line on the Atlantic…”
Southern Cultures, Volume 11, Number 1, Spring 2005

“A World Properly Put Together”: Environmental Knowledge in Charles Frazier’s Cold Mountain
     by Albert Way
     “It has been more than seven years since the publication of Charles Frazier’s Cold Mountain, and it has become nothing short of a phenomenon.”
Southern Cultures, Volume 10, Number 4, Winter 2004

Aspiration and Varieties of Religious Experience
     two poems by Lynn Powell
     “I saw God, my son once told me. He lives in a field of snow.
What could you see? Just snow. And footprints.”
Southern Cultures, Volume 10, Number 2, Summer 2004

A Southern Memory
     by Robert Flournoy
“‘Yessir, pretty fine shootin’, especially as it appears these birds were flying upside down.’”
Southern Cultures, Volume 10, Number 1, Spring 2004

“I Played by the Rules, and I Lost”: The Fight for Racial Equality in the North Carolina Agricultural Extension Service
     by P. E. Bazemore
edited by Kieran Taylor
     “You were there at the U.S. Supreme Court. Your name is called in that body of people. It was just frightening.”
Southern Cultures, Volume 9, Number 4, Winter 2003

Brooke Blevins
Hill Folks: A History of Arkansas Ozarkers and Their Image
     reviewed by John C. Inscoe
     “The Ozarks have long suffered from an image problem. Even compared with Appalachia–itself no stranger to degrading stereotypes and blatant misrepresentation–these other southern highlands have been exceptionally maligned.”
Southern Cultures, Volume 9, Number 3, Fall 2003

Hunter James
The Last Days of Big Grassy Fork
     reviewed by Fred C. Hobson
     ”James can certainly laugh at himself and his forebears–at his grandfather’s flying leap from a second-floor whorehouse window to a sturdy maple during the great Winston flook of 1916.”
Southern Cultures, Volume 9, Number 2, Summer 2003

To the Land I Am Bound: A Journey into Sacred Harp
     by David Carlton
      “As I found myself climbing over clay and gravel, negotiating switchbacks and sudden steep upgrades, I found myself thanking God for the weather and myself for my brand new transmission.”
Southern Cultures, Volume 9, Number 2, Summer 2003

The Fruits of Memory
     by Amy E. Weldon
     “The orchard was still hot, still rustling and green, still haunted by the terror of snake bodies writhing to life under your feet.”
Southern Cultures, Volume 9, Number 2, Summer 2003 

In Search of the Lost Confederate Graveyard
     photographs by Charlie Curtis
     “At last Curtis could sense that he was closing in on the lost Confederates.”
Southern Cultures, Volume 9, Number 1, Spring 2003

Harvey Broome
Out Under the Sky of the Great Smokies: A Personal Journal (review)
reviewed by Daniel S. Pierce
     “Broome relished hiking through mist-shrouded old-growth forests, sleeping in the rain, or rock-hopping in winter on ice-covered boulders.”
Southern Cultures, Volume 9, Number 1, Spring 2003

Kenneth E. Koons and Warren R. Hofstra
After the Backcountry: Rural Life in the Great Valley of Virginia, 1800-1900
reviewed by John C. Inscoe
     “The Valley served as a natural corridor of migration from the middle Atlantic colonies into the southern backcountry, and as such developed a distinctive character.”
Southern Cultures, Volume 8, Number 4, Winter 2002: Ghosts

The Dying Art of Deer-Driving in the South Carolina Low Country
     by Ileana Strauch
     “These images chronicle a century of tradition.”
Southern Cultures, Volume 8, Number 4, Winter 2002: Ghosts

“God Giveth the Increase”: Lurline Stokes Murray’s Narrative of Farming and Faith
     by Lu Ann Jones
     “‘Honey, in our way of life, there ain’t no banker’s hours, and I don’t find in the Bible there’s no such thing as an eight-hour day.’”
Southern Cultures, Volume 8, Number 3, Fall 2002: Biography

The Pond in Summertime
     poetry by Daniel Anderson
      “She is AM radio. Chevrolet.
The hot blacktop outside the Dairy Freeze.”
Southern Cultures, Volume 8, Number 2, Summer 2002

Thunder and A Southern Rhetoric
     two poems by Cathy Smith Bowers
“ . . . the land is long given up for dead
and farmers have disinherited the sky. . .”
Southern Cultures, Volume 8, Number 1, Spring 2002

David Cecelski
The Waterman’s Song: Slavery and Freedom in Maritime North Carolina
reviewed by William Scott
     “Slave boatmen carried more than goods and runaway slaves; they carried an insurgent, democratic vision born in the maritime districts of the slave South.”
Southern Cultures, Volume 8, Number 1, Spring 2002

Erik Larson
Isaac’s Storm: A Man, a Time, and the Deadliest Hurricane in History
Patricia Bellis Bixel and Elizabeth Haynes Turner
Galveston and the 1900 Storm: Castastrophe and Catalyst
Casey Edward Greene and Shelly Henley Kelly
Through a Night of Horrors: Voices from the 1900 Galveston Storm
reviewed by Jay Barnes
     “In one wretched night of wind and water in September 1900, Galveston endured a great hurricane that is still regarded as the deadliest natural disaster ever known to strike American soil.”
Southern Cultures, Volume 7, Number 4, Winter 2001

Al Burt
The Tropic of Cracker
Janisse Ray and Rob Storter
Ecology of a Cracker Childhood
Rob Storter
Crackers in the Glade: Life and Times in the Old Everglades
     reviewed by Carolyn Kindell, KC Smith, Andi Milam Reynolds
     “Her father locked the children and their mother in a back bedroom, and only after several hours and pleadings of hunger from the family did he allow Lee Ada to pick, with her eyes closed, a single package from the freezer to be eaten uncooked, because ‘that’s the way God says to feed the children.’”
Southern Cultures, Volume 7, Number 3, Fall 2001: Environment

Donald Edward Davis
Where There Are Mountains: An Environmental History of the Southern Appalachians
Daniel S. Pierce
The Great Smokies: From Natural Habitat to National Park
Margaret Lynn Brown
The Wild East: A Biography of the Great Smoky Mountains
reviewed by Frank G. Queen
     “He catalogued the plants he didn’t step on, the friendly people he met (he liked everybody, and everything–he devotes a couple of pages to the excellent character of the rattlesnake), and the liquor he didn’t drink.”
Southern Cultures, Volume 7, Number 3, Fall 2001: Environment

Mark Catesby
Catesby’s Birds of Colonial America
reviewed by T. Edward Nickens
     “Catesby broke rank with other naturalists, including the professionally trained Linnaeus, when he lambasted theories that birds hibernated in hollow trees or dove into the bottom of lakes and stayed there during the winter.”
Southern Cultures, Volume 7, Number 3, Fall 2001: Environment

The Taking of the Hatteras Light
     by Jan DeBlieu
with photographs by Michael Halminski
     “The taking of the Hatteras Light is a powerful statement about our society’s reluctance to accept change and loss, and our refusal to embrace the consequences of living in a world shaped by natural forces.”
Southern Cultures, Volume 7, Number 3, Fall 2001: Environment

“Welcome to Misery”
     photographs by Dan Sears
     “Sears has found the only region where misery is a state of mind and a seaside dock, where a gravestone will mark both a lifetime and a locality simply with a sentimental ‘here,’ and where even horses know better than northerners how to avoid summer heat.”
Southern Cultures, Volume 7, Number 3, Fall 2001: Environment

“All Goes Back to the Earth”: The Poetry of Wendell Berry
     by Henry Taylor
     “‘We sell the world to buy fire . . . our way lighted by burning men.’”
Southern Cultures, Volume 7, Number 3, Fall 2001: Environment

Kudzu: A Tale of Two Vines
     by Derek H. Alderman and Donna G’Segner Alderman
     “Perhaps no other part of the natural environment is more closely identified with the South than this invasive and fast growing vine.”
Southern Cultures, Volume 7, Number 3, Fall 2001: Environment

The Great Deluge
     as told to Charles D. Thompson Jr.
with photographs by Rob Amberg
     “We were behind one another praying to get out of that water.”
Southern Cultures, Volume 7, Number 3, Fall 2001: Environment

All Landscape Is Abstract, and Tends to Repeat Itself and
Autumn’s Sidereal, November’s a Ball and Chain
     two poems by Charles Wright
     “Still, who knows where the soul goes . . . after the light switch is turned off, who knows?”
Southern Cultures, Volume 7, Number 3, Fall 2001: Environment

Call me a Pogophile, and We’ll Take It Outside
     by Bryan Giemza
     “‘No shirt, no shoes, no service. . . . No guns.’”
Southern Cultures, Volume 7, Number 2, Summer 2001

The Dead Mule Rides Again
     by Jerry Leath Mills, with original drawings by Bruce Strauch
     “Uncle Jimbo ‘once won a twenty-dollar bet by eating a bologna sandwich while sitting on a dead mule.’”
Southern Cultures, Volume 6, Number 4, Winter 2000

John B. Rehder
Delta Sugar: Louisiana’s Vanishing Plantation Landscape
reviewed by John Michael Vlach
     “‘The plant would be dumping fifty-three million gallons of wastewater in the Mississippi daily.’”
Full Issue for Kindle ($7.96), for Nook ($7.96), or for Sony Reader ($9.45)  
Southern Cultures, Volume 6, Number 4, Winter 2000

Bridge of Words: Encounters with Virginia’s Natural Bridge
by Daniel Philippon
     ”Ever since Thomas Jefferson proclaimed the Natural Bridge to be ‘the most sublime of nature’s works,’ visitors have been flocking to this limestone arch.”
Southern Cultures, Volume 6, Number 3, Fall 2000

Again the Backward Region?: Environmental History in and of the American South
by Otis L. Graham
     ”Indian Summer will give way to a long season of planetary troubles–troubles in bunches.”
Southern Cultures, Volume 6, Number 2, Summer 2000 

“We were the Snopeses”: A Writer and Her Piedmont
by Doris Betts
     An unexpected kinship with Flannery O’Connor and an exploration of what it means to be a “piedmonter.”
Southern Cultures, Volume 5, Number 2, Summer 1999

Tenth Conference on Restoring Southern Gardens and Landscapes
The Influence of Women on the Southern Landscape
     reviewed by Rachel V. Mills
Southern Cultures, Volume 5, Number 1, Spring 1999 

Yoknapatawpha: Images and Voices
by George G. Stewart
     Haunting photographs from Mississippi evoke William Faulkner’s mythical landscape.
Southern Cultures, Volume 4, Number 3, Fall 1998

Mary Beth Pudup, Dwight B. Billings, and Altina L. Waller, editors
Appalachia in the Making: The Mountain South in the Nineteenth Century
     reviewed by David E. Whisnant
Southern Cultures, Volume 4, Number 3, Fall 1998

Mart A. Stewart
“What Nature Suffers to Groe”: Life, Labor, and Landscape on the Georgia Coast, 1680-1920
     reviewed by Albert E. Cowdrey 
Southern Cultures, Volume 4, Number 3, Fall 1998

David B. Freeman
Carved in Stone: The History of Stone Mountain
     reviewed by John M. Coski  
Southern Cultures, Volume 4, Number 3, Fall 1998 

J. W. Williamson
Hillbillyland: What the Movies Did to the Mountains and What the Mountains Did to the Movies
reviewed by James C. Wann
Southern Cultures, Volume 4, Number 2, Summer 1998 

Walt Wolfram and Natalie Schilling-Estes
Hoi Toide on the Outer Banks
     reviewed by Bruce Southard
Southern Cultures, Volume 4, Number 2, Summer 1998 

Oldest Living Confederate Chaplain Tells All?–Or, James B. Avirett and the Rise and Fall of the Rich Lands
by David Cecelski
   Compare the romanticized myth of the Avirett family decline with the economic and ecological reality.
Southern Cultures, Volume 3, Number 4, Winter 1997 

Rodney Barfield
Seasoned by Salt: A Historical Album of the Outer Banks

reviewed by Loyd Little
Southern Cultures, Volume 3, Number 2, Summer 1997 

The Great Wagon Road
by T. H. Breen
     Over two centuries ago the Moravians made their way into North Carolina on the Great Wagon Road, which has shaped regional and personal histories ever since.
Southern Cultures, Volume 3, Number 1, Spring 1997

H.E. Cornstock
The Pottery of the Shenandoah Valley Region

reviewed by Charles G. Zug III
Southern Cultures, Volume 3, Number 1, Spring 1997 

Beautifully Landscaped Grounds Invite You Home Each Day
poetry by Peter A. Coclanis
Southern Cultures, Volume 1, Number 4, Summer 1995 

Karl G. Heider, editor
Images of the South: Constructing a Regional Culture on Film and Video

reviewed by Ruth A. Banes
Southern Cultures, Volume 1, Number 4, Summer 1995